A Writer's 21st Century Memoir.

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What’s Woven Into The Fog

fog, foggy mist

I opened my door one morning to a vaguely thick layer of frigid gray fog. My charcoal-colored car, which was parked out front, barely emerged from the winter-like surroundings. I thought to myself that it hadn’t been this foggy this far inland in a while.

As I made my way down my apartment steps towards my car, a felt a small smile creep onto my face. It felt like it was now officially autumn, and not what felt like the perpetual summer, with brief pauses that allowed a chilly breeze, that most Southern Californians were accustomed to experiencing. I didn’t want to jinx it by grabbing a jacket, but I did think about all the sweaters I could now break out of the small “winter” section of my closet. Read the rest of this page »

Sitting Down To Write: My Thoughts On My Second Year Of #OctPoWriMo

close up letters and writing on paper in typewriter

Last year I walked into the October Poetry Writing Month (OctPoWriMo) challenge of writing 31 poems in 31 days blind. I tried to formulate a strategy that I could carry on to the next month with National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) as I was beginning the challenge, but by the end, I had thrown everything out the window. I just needed to write. I had to finish.

I ended up completing the poetry writing challenge again this year. I went in with a flexible plan. Write a few poems at a time, have a theme or several that can give you ideas for poem content, and just write whenever you can. It ultimately worked. I finished on time with a few smaller hiccups along the way, but I wasn’t as frantic as I was the year before about rushing to get a certain amount of poems done on time. Yes, the task was still a big one, but things seemed to go a little smoother. Read the rest of this page »

Two Thousand Miles In Two Days

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Two thousand and two miles and seven states in twenty-nine hours. My sister and I drove that distance in a small Hyundai Sonata from Tennessee to California. We celebrated as we passed state lines, posed in front of state signs, and nearly killed each other in the last eight hours before we made it to California.

My sister and I agreed to help our cousin by driving her car back to California from where she lived in Tennessee. She and her newborn baby were to take a flight back home as we tried not to crash her car while moving at top speeds across the country. However, after we began to see historical signs and interesting billboards, we decided to make a couple of stops along the way. Read the rest of this page »

#OctPoWriMo: Oct 27 & 28

antique black classic phone

OctPoWriMo #27: Drive 

The young ones would ride in the back seat fearing for their lives. 
The old kids would learn how to drive in the front seat with you. 
I would panic at the thought of my cousins out on the road, 
but you would calmly teach the drivers who were brand new. 
 
We would sit in the back seat of your large van completely carefree, 
listening to music, playing with cousins, and the foster kids that you raised. 
My first memories of you were on the back roads in your car. 
You were always out helping your town which always left me amazed. Read the rest of this page »

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