You Are Afraid, And I Understand

I had let it go for years, but the onslaught of deaths around me finally being publicized made me speak up to you, my friend. I know you will take your time reading this, but understand that this isn’t a message that comes from a place of bitterness and malice. I know that you are afraid, and I understand.

I was fearful too, but having fear doesn’t justify anything. Fear is just a lack of knowledge. The second you understand something is the second you stop fearing it. Through understanding, you find room to grow and begin to share love and kindness.

Once upon a time, before I knew what bisexuality was, I struggled with the thought of having to choose whether or not I would live my life as a lesbian or fake only like guys. It was silly. I had heard of the sexual orientation in high school, but I didn’t really believe it existed until I was forced to open up and discover more about myself in college.

I dove deep into the queer community, educated myself, and have since dedicated a lot of my time and experiences with writing towards activism. I looked at every side, spoke to other people with varying backgrounds, and then came to a more compassionate conclusion. It doesn’t change the fact that I was a complete ass in high school and that I was once very ignorant, but I can do my part now to help facilitate knowledge and introduce others to concepts that are new to them.

Continue reading “You Are Afraid, And I Understand”

Hello Dolly by Louis Armstrong

Get “Hello, Dolly!” by Louis Armstrong here.

Louis Armstrong, who was also known as Satchmo or Pops, was an American jazz trumpeter and singer from New Orleans, Louisiana. He is a musician and composer of jazz music, and is known as one of the founding fathers of jazz.

Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance. He has an instantly recognizable gravelly voice which allowed him to bend the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was skilled at scat singing and a charismatic stage presence that let audiences fall in love with his music.

Although Armstrong was a popular entertainer during a time in America that was severely racially divided, he rarely publicly politicized his race. However, he took a well-publicized stand for desegregation during the Little Rock Crisis. His artistry and personality allowed him socially acceptable access to the upper echelons of American society that were highly restricted for a black man.