More Than Just A Repeat of the Past

 

I Am The Future
Instagram | jasminedlowe

I watched as peaceful protests marched down the street. They held signs encouraging equality and protection of America’s most basic civil rights.

 

“It feels as though time is repeating itself,” I said watching faces of all shapes and colors float by. The sun, at that point, had already set leaving those marching passed me to appear as though their image was waning in and out of the darkness that made up a strange dream. It was surreal. “It’s like the 1960s all over again.”

I found myself a couple of years later at the Women’s March. I stood next to like-minded people of all genders, of different race, faiths, and orientations. They held similar signs like the marches from that night a couple of years before and marched down the streets of cities all over of the nation. A few older people who were in the crowds couldn’t help but make the comparison again. Continue reading “More Than Just A Repeat of the Past”

The Meet and Greet with Laverne Cox

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Instagram | @jasminedlowe

My sister sent me a text a few weeks ago about a talk Laverne Cox was giving at our university. She asked if I wanted to go, and then forwarded me a link to the university’s student government page where students with tickets to Laverne Cox’s talk could win a chance to meet the famed actress and activist by submitting a short writing response.

“Yeah, maybe I’ll do it,” I said to my sister. “I’m sure I wouldn’t win it, but I could always post it up on my blog.”

A couple of weeks went by before I thought about the writing submission again. I wonder when that short response is due?

I looked up the text on my phone that my sister had sent me and noticed the familiar date. I realized that I only had a few hours before the time would be up, and so I quickly grabbed my laptop and began writing on the day the writing submission was due. Continue reading “The Meet and Greet with Laverne Cox”

What Martin Luther King Had Said

baltimore-cover-finalIn April 2015, Baltimore police had arrested 25-year-old African-American, Freddie Gray. He had sustained injuries to his spine and larynx, fell into a coma on April 12, and despite multiple surgical attempts, he never regained consciousness. Gray died a week later in police custody. Six police officers have been suspended pending an investigation, but not much else has been done to prevent this sort of thing from happening again.

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics latest available report, published in 2011, at least 4,813 people have died while in custody of local and state law enforcement between 2003 and 2009. Sixty-one percent of those deaths were classified as homicides.

There were an estimated 98 million arrests in the United States by local, state, and federal law enforcement from the years 2003 to 2009, according to FBI statistics. However fifteen states, not including the District of Columbia, did not consistently report deaths in police custody during that period—and Maryland, along with Georgia and Montana, didn’t submit any records at all.

What started as peaceful protests voicing their concern for their lives in Baltimore, gave way to civil unrest following the death of Freddie Gray. As of April 28, at least 250 people have been arrested, thousands of police and Maryland Army National Guard troops have been deployed, and a state of emergency was declared in the city limits of Baltimore. Continue reading “What Martin Luther King Had Said”

Math and the Patriarchy

Photo by Wanda Dechant via Flickr
Photo by Wanda Dechant via Flickr

The subject came about when she had uttered the words, “boys are just better at math.” My eyes metaphorically rolled so far back into my head that they could have fallen back into my throat.

I tried to reason with her in the most polite way possible. “I think a lot of it has to do with the different ways in we teach boys and girls, how society treats boys and girls differently, and how this notion of ‘boys are just better at math, and girls are just better at literature and language,’ has been subtly indoctrinated into the minds of the masses throughout all of time and has affected the way that girls see themselves in the classroom.”  Continue reading “Math and the Patriarchy”

A New Way of Thinking

Photo by theloushe via Flickr
Photo by theloushe via Flickr

It happens every so often when my sister and I come down to our conservative hometown and get a little too relaxed with our thinking. We occasional would end up shouting at a relative who still doesn’t believe that the members of the Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community should have the right to marry because of their religious beliefs.

We attempt to sway their thinking from the teachings that they received all of their lives from clerical figures and open their minds to other religious options that include love, such as the Religious Left, but like the LGBT movement we would end up arguing about the thoughts from the older relatives minds still had a long ways to go. Continue reading “A New Way of Thinking”

“U” is for Uplift

U Writers of Kern Blogging Challenge (A-Z)

It’s happening all over. Feminists criticizing other feminists for not being their version of what feminism means. I read an article on The Week about Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus and their public responses to each other’s approach on touching the subject of feminism through their very different music videos. However, it wasn’t until I reached the bottom of the article that it stated part of what I wanted to say about the situation. Continue reading ““U” is for Uplift”

“R” is for Remembering

RWriters of Kern Blogging Challenge (A-Z)

“Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.”
― Søren Kierkegaard

Last night I attended a talk given by Myrlie Evers-Williams, the former chairwoman of the NAACP, a civil rights activist, the author of several published books and journalist who worked for over three decades to seek justice for the murder of her civil rights activist husband Medgar Evers in 1963, at Scripps College (one of the colleges at The Clairemont Colleges). I listened as she spoke about the progress that our country has made from the days where African-American people were forced to count the number of beans in a jar or the number of bubbles on a bar of soap in order to vote, to now where men and women of every color now has the opportunity to vote as a citizen. Continue reading ““R” is for Remembering”

Flying Over The Atlantic

Why We Still Need Strong Female Role Models

As Published by Miss Millennia Magazine

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“I am sure he said to himself, ‘Watch me make them scamper,’” she said. She stood her ground as the aircraft came close. “I did not understand it at the time, but I believe that little red airplane said something to me as it swished by.” –Amelia Earhart

Eighty-six years ago on a May 20-21 1927 a young pilot made the first solo transatlantic and first non-stop fixed-wing aircraft flight between America and mainland Europe. The Ryan monoplane aircraft named, Spirit of St. Louis, carried Charles A. Lindbergh 3,600 nautical miles from Roosevelt Field, New York to Paris–Le Bourget Airport, in 33 and a half hours. Five years later on May 20, 1932 another pilot made a solo transatlantic flight that spanned from Harbour Grace, Newfoundland to a pasture at Culmore, north of Derry, Northern Ireland, that lasted 14 hours and 56 minutes. Continue reading “Flying Over The Atlantic”

I’m A Feminist, But I Don’t Burn My Bra

burningbraThe common misconception about modern-day feminists is this outdated visual of a female middle-class flower-child with unruly long hair and no shoes setting fire to her bra on the street in protest. Society also pictures the angry radical feminist with Doc Martins and pink punk hair harassing other women about their “non-traditionally feminist” life choices, but today I want to set the record straight. Yes, there are some crazy feminists out there that are on one end of a well-developed spectrum of women and gender studies, and I do respect the fact that it did take hard work and a bit of push to get the rights and liberties that we do have today, but those viewpoints are not the only theory in the feminist thought bubble. Continue reading “I’m A Feminist, But I Don’t Burn My Bra”

Women Through the Eyes of Religion

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As Published in Miss Millennia Magazine

There are many questions in our universe that are left unanswered, and there are images tucked away in the cosmos still yet to be seen. Humans live their lives only knowing some of the ways of the world, and at other times they may not even know their own selves. According to some estimates, there are roughly 4,200 religions in the world each offering a solution to the great mysteries of the world. They do their best to set aside a collection of world views and belief and cultural systems that may act as a moral compass. The meaning of life and the origin of the universe can be explained away for now with dogma, but when you look at the roles given by women in the majority of the world’s more popular religions, one begins to wonder if women are seen as equals to men in a spiritual sense. Continue reading “Women Through the Eyes of Religion”