Why I Don’t Tell People To Go To College Anymore

college books

A deep yet anxious sigh escaped from the mouth on the other end of the phone call. The heavy breath was shaky as it struggled to push out words that were too nervous to reach my ears. There was a brief pause before my friend revealed her confession. “Jas, I don’t think college is for me.”

For years I spoke vehemently in favor of getting an education. I stressed the importance of college on everyone around me until they began to believe it themselves. College was a must, especially in my household. I still remember my sister jokingly telling my mom she didn’t have to go to college because she actually wanted to be a clown. To which my mom replied, “well, then you will go to clown college and become the best clown out there.” I couldn’t tell if my mother was joking. However, the point was made from an early age that college was the key to success until my views on the matter changed. Continue reading “Why I Don’t Tell People To Go To College Anymore”

Learn By Doing: Graduating Into “The Real World”

IG | @jasminedlowe
IG | @jasminedlowe

My time spent at Cal Poly Pomona had taught me a lot of things. Among the incredibly valuable information that I have gathered, I have learned how to bs presentations during my brief stint as an architecture student, I learned how to write a fairly decent 20-page-paper in one night, and I learned everything else just by doing it on my own. In fact the motto of the University I had graduated from a couple of years ago, was to learn by doing.

I spent the majority of my four years as an undergrad working part time jobs, and interesting internships. The most interesting to date being the time I worked for a hypnotist. However, each position I have held over the years, each project I have completed, every piece of literature I have written has all contributed to what I know today. Continue reading “Learn By Doing: Graduating Into “The Real World””

“G” is for Grad School

GEveryone thinks they have an idea about what grad school is going to be like. They know that they will end up writing. A Lot. They know that there is a ton of research involved, and that they will be able to focus on the academic subject that they really care about.  But what they don’t know is that their lives will forever be changed, not just because they are moving forward into the next step on the higher education ladder toward a deeper understanding of their field, but because they also will never look at things the same way again.

Here are several other things they won’t tell you about grad school. Continue reading ““G” is for Grad School”

Massive Online Classes A Distraction?

computersI keep a tab open on my laptop that tracks higher education updates on Google News. The majority of the time I become frustrated with articles about budget cuts and opinions on the infamous question of whether it’s worth it financially to get a college degree from a four year university.  The other day, however, I saw an article about massive open online courses, or MOOC, and how they supposedly distract universities and cost them money, according to a consultancy firm that advises institutions, governments and investors on issues related to higher education. The thing is, if there’s a way to provide extra classes at a reduced cost for the students partaking in the course, shouldn’t universities be on board? Continue reading “Massive Online Classes A Distraction?”

How Technology Will Impact Higher Education

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As published by Examiner.com

Smart phones, tablets, laptops and social media have changed the way we function in our lives and in society. They have made connecting with people and the world around us easier, and have created a new way of communicating. Because this change in the way we interact with each other has influenced all of our lives, it also makes sense that social technology has also changed the way we approach education. Continue reading “How Technology Will Impact Higher Education”

High-tech Education in Obama’s State of the Union Address

Education

As published by Examiner.com

Propositions for pushing better strategies for climate control, the discussion of gun laws and immigration reform were just some of the topics President Obama spoke about during the State of the Union Address Tuesday night in Washington. The speech given by Obama showed a sterner president pushing for Congress to come together for the nation. One of the other major topics covered by Obama included education and its relation to technology and the competitive job market and how the nation’s students stand with the rest of the world. Continue reading “High-tech Education in Obama’s State of the Union Address”

Passage of Prop 30 Is Giving You Back Your Money

California university and college students–parents of those California university and college students. Remember at the beginning of this academic school year when you had to pay more tuition because of the state’s huge deficit. Well we still have the deficit but you may be receiving some of that money back in your pocket.

Continue reading “Passage of Prop 30 Is Giving You Back Your Money”

What’s on the Ballot in California?- Part 2

There is more to this year’s election than selecting the President of the United States. (There is also more than just Mitt Romney and Barack Obama on the ballot as well but that’s another discussion entirely). Along with individuals electing officials from party-nominated, voter-nominated and nonpartisan offices at the district, city, state and national levels, your state will also tack on propositions, or submitted measures, for registered voters to pass if they feel that it is necessary.

These measures end up on the ballot by either the Legislature, which has the ability to place constitutional amendments, bond measures, and proposed changes in law on the ballot or by any California voter who follows the initiative qualifying process.

After these selected initiatives, or a referendums, are placed on the ballot the state’s voters can go to the polls and select “yes” or “no” to support or oppose the advocated a course of action imposed from a specific viewpoint.

In the 2012 election there are eleven measures submitted to the voters. They cover different subjects, often include an influx in state tax revenue for execution and they are sometimes a little vague if you decide to read their descriptions for the first time while you’re standing at the voters’ booth. Continue reading “What’s on the Ballot in California?- Part 2”

What’s on the Ballot in California?- Part 1

There is more to this year’s election than selecting the President of the United States. (There is also more than just Mitt Romney and Barack Obama on the ballot as well but that’s another discussion entirely). Along with individuals electing officials from party-nominated, voter-nominated and nonpartisan offices at the district, city, state and national levels, your state will also tack on propositions, or submitted measures, for registered voters to pass if they feel that it is necessary.

These measures end up on the ballot by either the Legislature, which has the ability to place constitutional amendments, bond measures, and proposed changes in law on the ballot or by any California voter who follows the initiative qualifying process.

After these selected initiatives, or a referendums, are placed on the ballot the state’s voters can go to the polls and select “yes” or “no” to support or oppose the advocated a course of action imposed from a specific viewpoint.

In the 2012 election there are eleven measures submitted to the voters. They cover different subjects, often include an influx in state tax revenue for execution and they are sometimes a little vague if you decide to read their descriptions for the first time while you’re standing at the voters’ booth. Continue reading “What’s on the Ballot in California?- Part 1”

Job Experience Vs. Higher Education

A post from the archives…

I had just come home from a long day at work at my minimum wage paying department store job when I was confronted with this question on a website that I had happened to stumble upon:

Considering the ever-increasing cost of higher education, and the student loans which many college kids amass while working for their various degrees, do you feel the economy actually turned the tide and made job experience just as or more valuable than higher education?

It’s true. The economy is in the crapper and there are millions of students out there drowning in college debt. Is it worth it? I still think so, but I do think having a bit of experience under your belt is also an incredibly smart thing to do. Continue reading “Job Experience Vs. Higher Education”