Visibility in the 2015 State of the Union Address

Photo by Pete Souza, Talk Radio News Service -- A Member of Congress wearing a ribbon in support of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., reads along as President Barack Obama delivers the State of the Union address in the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 25, 2011
Photo by Pete Souza, Talk Radio News Service

Last night’s State of the Union Address from President Obama has called for a lot of action form Congress. I’ve talked before about Obama attempting to make community college free for American students in the near future, and how this will ultimately benefit the nation as we aim to grow and move forward, but there is a list of other things Obama wants to get done before he leaves office which also includes expanding paid sick leave and reforming the tax code.

I have no more campaigns to run. My only agenda for the next two years is the same as the one I’ve had since the day I swore an oath on the steps of this Capitol – to do what I believe is best for America. If you share the broad vision I outlined tonight, join me in the work at hand. If you disagree with parts of it, I hope you’ll at least work with me where you do agree. And I commit to every Republican here tonight that I will not only seek out your ideas, I will seek to work with you to make this country stronger. -President Barack Obama

Continue reading “Visibility in the 2015 State of the Union Address”

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Year of Action and Fair Wages in SOTU

Photo by ktgeek via Flickr
Photo by ktgeek via Flickr

According to President Obama’s 2014 State of the Union Address which took place Tuesday, this is the “year of action.” The president reiterated some of his past legislative priorities by promising to close the prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and to reform unemployment insurance, but he also spoke about developing regulations to limit carbon emissions at the nation’s power plants, MyRA, a new savings bond which would encourage citizens to save for retirement and, most notably, to increase in the minimum wage to $10.10 from $7.25. Continue reading “Year of Action and Fair Wages in SOTU”

The Biggest Issues Generation Y Faces Today

Generation-Y-RockstarsAs Published In Miss Millennia Magazine

Generation Y is unlike any other generation in our history. With a touch of a button, and the switching on of a mobile cellular device, we are instantaneously connected to the four corners of the earth, and can communicate and express our thoughts with the entire world. We have the power to change the future just by sitting down behind a laptop, and with every moment of every day our generation is learning, growing and evolving so that we can make the world a better place. However, with all of this potential and power come some setbacks and challenges for the young generation of global social networking pioneers. Continue reading “The Biggest Issues Generation Y Faces Today”

In The Aftermath of the Trayvon Martin Case

trayvon

As Published in Miss Millennia Magazine

The “death of Trayvon Martin was a tragedy,” said President Barack Obama in a statement a day after the verdict in the George Zimmerman on CNN. “Not just for his family, or for any one community, but for America. I know this case has elicited strong passions. And in the wake of the verdict, I know those passions may be running even higher. But we are a nation of laws, and a jury has spoken. I now ask every American to respect the call for calm reflection from two parents who lost their young son. And as we do, we should ask ourselves if we’re doing all we can to widen the circle of compassion and understanding in our own communities. We should ask ourselves if we’re doing all we can to stem the tide of gun violence that claims too many lives across this country on a daily basis. We should ask ourselves, as individuals and as a society, how we can prevent future tragedies like this. As citizens, that’s a job for all of us. That’s the way to honor Trayvon Martin.”

Protesters in Pershing Square on Monday. Credit: Francine Orr, Los Angeles Times
Protesters in Pershing Square on Monday. Credit: Francine Orr, Los Angeles Times

Protests nationwide, while mostly peaceful outside of Los Angeles, reveal the anger that came with the acquittal of George Zimmerman, the man who readily acknowledges that he shot and killed Trayvon Martin, but said he did so in self-defense. The “not guilty” verdict of murder or manslaughter beyond a reasonable doubt didn’t do much to quell the feelings of “not innocent” for the neighborhood watchmen who left his home with a gun in Sanford, Florida, February 2012, to follow unarmed 17-year-old, Trayvon Martin. Continue reading “In The Aftermath of the Trayvon Martin Case”

Women and Politics

“I didn’t run to make history, I ran to make a difference,” said Wisconsin’s newly elected female and first openly gay person elected to the U.S. Senate, Rep. Tammy Baldwin, but it’s probably safe to say that she is on her way to make history while accomplishing her goal to make a difference.

Senator Baldwin has not only carved her place in history by being first openly gay person elected to the U.S. Senate, but she was also a part of a group of powerful women senators-elect who won seats held by men.

Democrat, and U.S. Rep., Tammy Baldwin took an open Senate seat over Republican Tommy Thompson who had served 14 years as the state’s governor and was former U.S. secretary of Health and Human Services under President George W. Bush. Republican Deb Fischer defeated Democrat Bob Kerrey, a former two-term senator from the state, for an open seat in Nebraska during 2012 election. Democrat Elizabeth Warren, a Harvard University professor whose attacks on Wall Street fueled her campaign, won her race against the Republican incumbent, Sen. Scott Brown in Massachusetts and was the first woman to represent her state in the U.S. Senate. Continue reading “Women and Politics”

A Youthful Voice

I was armed with my laptop streaming live coverage of the event through various web and news sites, I listened to my phone streaming special live coverage from NPR, and I kept in touch with friends watching the election unfold through Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and text. We were all pumped and excited to the point where we all could have been mistaken for football fanatics at the Super Bowl. I was truly amazed for more reasons than just getting to hear the election results, but because I had encountered so many young voters who took the time and try to educate themselves on the issues and voice their opinions at the polls.

I was so proud of my generations attempt at completing their civic duty and caring about their future. They saw the importance of knowing what was going on around them and how it could affect their entire life, and regardless of who they voted for or their political affiliation, I was, and I’m still, incredibly happy that the majority of my friends (except for one individual who has complained about her rights before…) mailed a ballot in or went to their voting place to make a difference. Continue reading “A Youthful Voice”

The Importance Of Being Politically Aware

Re-posted from UloopCPP

Conversations about the upcoming Presidential election have been popping up practically everywhere I go. News stories and opinions fly off the handle from people of all ages, and stated beliefs and facts tumble into some incredibly interesting debates.

I absolutely love discussing news and politics with anyone willing to sit down for a minute and chat with me, but just as the rise in the well-informed debates pop up around the election season, so does the apprehension of that fact that there are many individuals out there that don’t even have a clue about who our past presidents were. Continue reading “The Importance Of Being Politically Aware”

Religion In Politics: Why Is This Even A Thing?

“I am not the Catholic candidate for President. I am the Democratic Party candidate for President who also happens to be a Catholic. I do not speak for my Church on public matters – and the Church does not speak for me…No one asked me my religion [serving the Navy] in the South Pacific.” President John F. Kennedy addressing fears that his being Catholic would impact his decision-making to the Greater Houston Ministerial Association on September 12, 1960

More than fifty years ago, during a very memorable presidential election campaign, the American people were concerned about the religion of their possible president. Though many people regarded Catholicism as another sect of Christianity, many people believed that the leadership of the church would take over control and ruin everyone’s lives. The problem with this assumption is that it heavily influenced the opinion by the American people of then presidential candidate John F. Kennedy. The belief was that if Kennedy was elected then the Pope, or the Bishop of Rome and the spiritual head of the worldwide Catholic Church, would then become a partial ruler of the United States by influencing Kennedy’s decisions. Continue reading “Religion In Politics: Why Is This Even A Thing?”

CISPA Passed?!

I think we all remember the raising of awareness and protest against the cyber-oriented bills, SOPA and PIPA were going on or maybe even ACTA if you kept up with the news. If not then you probably remember not being able to rip-off your homework form Wikipedia earlier this year.

This time CISPA, or the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, takes the reins as another vaguely worded cyber bill that can quickly veer off its intended path and completely demolish our civil liberties. The sad thing about this is that CISPA has already passed in the House and is on its way to the Senate. Continue reading “CISPA Passed?!”

Why You Should Vote Obama If You Have a Uterus

I’ve talked a little before about how a lot of the Republican candidates for the 2012 presidential election were very confused about where they stood on the issues.

During his 2002 campaign for governor, Romney supported abortion rights saying “I will preserve and protect a women’s right to choose,” during a debate against his Democratic opponent Shannon O’Brien. Then during his term as governor, Romney vetoed a bill in 2005 that would expand access to emergency contraception. In an op-ed explaining his veto he wrote that he was “pro-life” and also wrote that while he didn’t favor abortion, that he would not change the state’s abortion laws. Then six years later, Romney made clear is current anti-abortion stance, writing in a National Journal op-ed, that he supports overturning Roe v. Wade and defunding Planned Parenthood, “If I have the opportunity to serve as our nation’s next president, I commit to doing everything in my power to cultivate, promote, and support a culture of life in America.”

Romney recently flip-flopped on an amendment that would define life as beginning at conception which would outlaw most forms of birth control and throw women back into the dark ages. Continue reading “Why You Should Vote Obama If You Have a Uterus”