A Writer's 21st Century Memoir.

“A” is for Application

A

Writers of Kern Blogging Challenge (A-Z)

I submitted my grad school application to groups of faculty and administration at a few schools in state this past year. I spent time double checking and triple checking the checklist of items needed to be submitted for consideration, and eventually mailed them all off at the same time while crossing my fingers for luck as I walked out of the local postal officeโ€™s door. I waited for a while, and heard back from the school that I was really hoping to attend. It was a short impersonal email rejecting me from entering into the school as a student without any in-depth explanation. I could have clicked out of the email and carried on with my life as a prospective student now excluded from the educational institution she really wanted to get into, but I didnโ€™t. I put my dedication to use and inquired further about my situation.

I eventually stumbled on to another page that categorized the impersonal response from the university into reason codes for denying an applicant. According to the school, I apparently had not sent in all of the materials on my checklist that were needed, even though I remember sending everything in the post. I, of course, was upset, but I decided to take it a few steps further and call the graduate admittance office for some clarification.

I had kept my copy of the receipt with the tracking code on the package that I sent to the university and tried to locate where my future had landed. It was confirmed that the package arrived at the school, but it was nowhere to be found when I called the admissions office for answers.

I played phone tag and listened to holding music for a few hours looking for the explanation that was lacking from the impersonal email I received that day, but I managed to end up speaking with the graduate advisor I initially spoke to several months before for more advice. She too confirmed that my application materials were nowhere to be found and that there were options for reapplying/appealing an admissions decision.

The graduate advisor worked with me, and told me that I could resubmit the materials via email directly to her, so that she could get them over to the group of faculty and administration who would decide my fate. I managed to contact all of the professors I had asked to write a letter of recommendation for me and they agreed to help me resubmit the documents to the advisor. I resubmitted transcripts, my essay, test scores, my resume and work samples in such a state of panic, because for some reason the universe had attempted to take a dump on me and not let me properly apply for grad school, but I kept cool in front of staff and faculty hoping to win them over in a search for graduate students.

After experiencing the worst scenario for a prospective student to possibly have, I did end up getting accepted into the program, and just assumed the universe had a terrible sense of humor psyching me out like that. Thinking back on it now, it seems as though the situation also could have been an elaborate test for me to prove my ability to speak up, work hard and apply myself in order to reach my goals. Either that or the postal service messed up and just lost my package and said otherwise.

15 responses

  1. Congratulations Jasmine! I am so glad that you go what you wanted and deserve! When I applied to transfer to CPP, I initially was denied. After a letter to admissions saying how disappointed I was in the institution for not giving members of the community a second chance etc etc, I received a call informing me that I had check an incorrect box . . . Really? That’s why I was denied? Had I not looked into it, I wouldn’t have made it to CPP. We must always speak up. Good for you. Congrats again! So happy for you, I look forward to your updates ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Like

    September 11, 2013 at 1:51 PM

    • Thank you! ๐Ÿ™‚ Yes, I’m so glad I looked into their decision for initially denying me. I absolutely love my classes and I couldn’t image missing out on such a wonderful opportunity now.

      Like

      September 11, 2013 at 1:59 PM

  2. Jasmine,
    First of all congrats on being accepted! Second, what courage you showed by doing so much research into why you weren’t initially accepted. I think it was a sign of how strong you really are and how bad you wanted this dream to come true.
    Nothing should ever stand in the way of your dreams. Very awesome story.
    Joan

    Like

    September 12, 2013 at 1:54 PM

  3. Thankfully, you didn’t give up. I’ve yet to pursue my post graduate education – envy is mine, and congrat’s are yours!

    Like

    September 12, 2013 at 3:39 PM

  4. Congratulations! Hard work and determination always pays off. I wish you much success!

    Like

    September 12, 2013 at 6:45 PM

  5. Way to go, Jasmine! I love that you didn’t just take “no” for an answer and persevered. I loved this line: “Thinking back on it now, it seems as though the situation also could have been an elaborate test for me to prove my ability to speak up, work hard and apply myself in order to reach my goals.” You showed’em! Congratulations. xoA

    Like

    September 12, 2013 at 9:27 PM

    • Thank you, Annis. Lol, it does seem as though it could have been a test. I’m glad I passed. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

      September 13, 2013 at 11:34 AM

  6. Davyd Morris

    I love it! Just don’t take “No’ for an answer. Your tenacity was rewarded with a much-deserved admission, a life lesson, and a boost to your self-confidence. What a win. They’re lucky to have you on their team.

    Like

    September 14, 2013 at 6:57 PM

  7. Persistence. Congrats for sure and I hope you have fun at school.

    Like

    September 15, 2013 at 5:30 AM

  8. Perseverence is key to a great many things. Just think…what if you’d accepted that first impersonal rejection as fact and absolute? It’s an interesting thing to look back…wonder which challenges you passed, failed or simply didn’t recognize.

    Like

    September 15, 2013 at 7:24 PM

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